The Anchor of Faith

With the arrival of spring, a friend and I sat beside a lake, watching several ducks with their babies actively meandering around near the shoreline in pursuit of food.  Suddenly, a terror-filled, heartbreaking scene unfolded before our eyes.  The flock of birds darted towards the water as a hawk swooped down from overhead and scarfed up one of the ducklings.  My friend and I just felt shock, despair and numbness.  What could we do?  Absolutely nothing.

Here, in the hospital, we, as associates, as well as the patients in our care and their loved ones endure numerous experiences where we feel like our “hands are tied”—where we feel like absolutely nothing can be done.  An unexpected admission into the hospital.  A code that lasts for what seems like eternity.  A new diagnosis of a terminal illness.  An increase in our workload due to the absence of a co-worker.  A sudden change in a patient’s condition that leads to death.  Through various circumstances, we wrestle through a plethora of emotions, riding the rollercoaster of life in a sense of daze and confusion.

However, the clergyman Thomas S. Monson once stated, “Amidst the confusion of the times, the conflicts of conscience, and the turmoil of daily living, an abiding faith becomes an anchor to our lives.”  This faith brings a sense of grounding in the chaos of burdensome times; it brings us to our knees where we can fully lean on the Lord, trusting Him to act according to His will.  In the presence of the Father, we are reminded of what Moses said to Joshua and all of Israel in Deuteronomy 31:8: “The Lord himself goes before you and will be with you; He will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged.”  Fully trust in the Lord to be your anchor, and know that, with eternal hope, He can turn the nothing into something!

 

 

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